Text boot : Getting rid of bootsplash/Plymouth in Manjaro or Arch Linux

I like seeing my kernel spewing messages on my terminal when I boot my PC. I like the transparency, the openness. Having kernel messages visible can also help in understanding certain boot issues.

This is how to get a completely GUI free/bootsplash free/plymouth free, fully terminal or text based boot process on Manjaro/Arch Linux:

Open /etc/default/grub:

sudo nano /etc/default/grub

nano is the editor I chose. Other editors can be used provided they are opened with root privileges.

The /etc/default/grub file has many lines but only the below one is to be modified to attain our objective:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash"

The above line needs to be transformed to the following:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet text"

We are not done yet. Do the following:

sudo grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg

Now reboot and rejoice!

The terminal resolution might be a bit of a concern for those with an eye for details. If that is the case, find the following lines in /etc/default/grub:

# The resolution used on graphical terminal
# note that you can use only modes which your graphic card supports via VBE
# you can see them in real GRUB with the command `vbeinfo'
GRUB_GFXMODE=480x480

Change the value of GRUB_GFXMODE to the resolution of your liking:

GRUB_GFXMODE=1920x1200

Done!

Further Research:

Kernel parameters

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The USING keyword in C#: How to clean unnecessary using directives in Visual Studio

using KEYWORD IN C#

There are two ways of using the using keyword in C#:

  1. As a statement
  2. As a directive

using KEYWORD AS A STATEMENT

MSDN says the using keyword

Provides a convenient syntax that ensures the correct use of IDisposable objects.

This is also a way of saying that this is the standard way of releasing unmanaged resources. The following is an example of its usage:


using(StreamWriter grepLog = new StreamWriter(fileName, true))
{
// ...log code here
}

using KEYWORD AS A DIRECTIVE

This is the most common usage of the using keyword. The following example shows how using keyword is used to access types in a namespace. This practice of using the using directives to access types in a namespace allows the developer to avoid fully qualifying the type. This save a lot of time and typing.


using System;

using System.Text;

Another use of using is to create aliases. An excellent discussion on this topic can be found in this Stackoverflow thread.

CLEANING using DIRECTIVES

There are many reasons why your .cs file may end up having more using directives than necessary. There is a very quick way to clean and organize using directives in Visual Studio. Just right-click on the text editor. The context menu pops up and the second option in the menu is Organize Usings.

This menu item has three sub-items:

  1. Remove Unused Usings
  2. Sort Usings
  3. Remove and Sort

OrganizeUsingsInVisualStudioTextEditorContextMenu

Remove Unused Usings:

This option simply removes unused using directives. The end result would be like:

OrganizeUsingsInVisualStudio_RemoveUnusedUsings

Sort Usings:

This option only sorts the using directives alphabetically. It does nothing else. Also, the sort can not be done in reverse alphabetical order:

OrganizeUsingsInVisualStudio_SortUsings

Remove and Sort Usings:

This option removes all unused using directives and sorts the list too. This sorting is also done alphabetically and no reverse alphabetical sorting option is available:

OrganizeUsingsInVisualStudio_RemoveAndSortUsings

This keeps the class file clean and some unnecessary lines of code can be reduced (if that sort of thing appeals to you).